Tokyo Fiancée

Tokyo Fiancée

DVD - 2015
Average Rating:
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Based on Amelie Nothomb's bestselling novel, Tokyo Fiancee is a dark romantic comedy that will appeal to fans of Jean-Pierre Jeunet's Amelie and Sofia Coppola's Lost in Translation. The young, pixie-like Amelie is in love with all things Japanese, which prompts her to buy a one-way ticket to Tokyo in order to completely immerse herself in Japanese culture. She offers to work as a French tutor, and soon finds herself enjoying a passionate relationship with her only student, the charming Rinri.
Publisher: New York, NY : First Run Features, [2015]
Branch Call Number: DVD FOREIGN Tok
Characteristics: video file,DVD video
digital,optical
1 videodisc (100 min.) : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in

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j
jimg2000
Jul 19, 2016

Opening dialogue, introduction:

l was 20. l wanted to be Japanese, it was my sole ambition. By chance, l was born in Japan. That should've helped, but chance is fickle. My parents were Belgian, not Japanese. They worked in Japan. When l was 5 they went back to Belgium, taking me with them. During childhood and adolescence, l dreamed of one thing: to return to Japan to become what, despite appearances, l was, a real Japanese. One day l bought a one-way ticket to Tokyo. l arrived with only my 20 years. Actually, l wanted to be more than Japanese. l also wanted to be a writer. l wanted to be a venerable Japanese writer. lt would be more complicated, but that's another story. No, in fact, it's the same story.
===
lronically, l'd met the only Japanese who wasn't part of this famous floating world, this world that suited me so well, where nothing is black or white, entirely yes or no, this world of impermanence. The Japanese feel more than they express.

j
jimg2000
Jul 19, 2016

Muses:
"Everything that one loves becomes fiction" - Amélie Nothomb
===
"Thanks for loving our country, but we Japanese must face our misfortune alone."
===
ln fact, there's no French word for what l felt for Rinri. The Japanese word "koi" came closest. "Koi" can be translated as both "carp" and "liking". l totally dislike carp, but l had a liking for Rinri. His company was to my liking. l was always happy with him, but also without him.
===
l was dying to see the Japanese mountains in the snow. 90 minutes from Tokyo was a path that promised grand, inspiring views. Back then, l loved mountains almost as much as l loved Japan. l mean, Japanese mountains represented a sort of pinnacle for me. Come to think of it, they still do.
===
Early on, the Japanese realized that talk is the bane of dining. For a time, the task of speaking was relegated to geishas. Today, we call them professional conversationalists. But really, they're still geishas.

j
jimg2000
Jul 19, 2016

A real Japanese has to climb Mt Fuji:
l was exhausted, but at the same time ecstatic. Something had changed in me. l'd been lost in Japan. Mt Fuji had found me again. lt taught me a lesson. Taught me that you can escape death. That is, a rigid image you have of yourself. l was 20 years old. l had yet to find what l was searching for. And that's why l loved life. That day l learned that to love, l had to be free. That day l learned that birth means both pain and joy. That day l learned that l had to become all the people l was, all the people l hadn't yet met. l learned that day l was as large as life. lf you die, go. lf you suffer, move. Movement is the only rule. The only dishonor is not being free.
===
Amelie to worker cleaning the pool she was in: lt's not necessary.
Worker: No English!
Amelie: lt's not English, it's Japanese!

j
jimg2000
Jun 04, 2016

Opening dialogue, introduction:

l was 20. l wanted to be Japanese, it was my sole ambition. By chance, l was born in Japan. That should've helped, but chance is fickle. My parents were Belgian, not Japanese. They worked in Japan. When l was 5 they went back to Belgium, taking me with them. During childhood and adolescence, l dreamed of one thing: to return to Japan to become what, despite appearances, l was, a real Japanese. One day l bought a one-way ticket to Tokyo. l arrived with only my 20 years. Actually, l wanted to be more than Japanese. l also wanted to be a writer. l wanted to be a venerable Japanese writer. lt would be more complicated, but that's another story. No, in fact, it's the same story.
===
lronically, l'd met the only Japanese who wasn't part of this famous floating world, this world that suited me so well, where nothing is black or white, entirely yes or no, this world of impermanence. The Japanese feel more than they express.

j
jimg2000
Jun 04, 2016

Muses:
"Everything that one loves becomes fiction" - Amélie Nothomb
===
"Thanks for loving our country, but we Japanese must face our misfortune alone."
===
ln fact, there's no French word for what l felt for Rinri. The Japanese word "koi" came closest. "Koi" can be translated as both "carp" and "liking". l totally dislike carp, but l had a liking for Rinri. His company was to my liking. l was always happy with him, but also without him.
===
l was dying to see the Japanese mountains in the snow. 90 minutes from Tokyo was a path that promised grand, inspiring views. Back then, l loved mountains almost as much as l loved Japan. l mean, Japanese mountains represented a sort of pinnacle for me. Come to think of it, they still do.
===
Early on, the Japanese realized that talk is the bane of dining. For a time, the task of speaking was relegated to geishas. Today, we call them professional conversationalists. But really, they're still geishas.

j
jimg2000
Jun 04, 2016

A real Japanese has to climb Mt Fuji:
l was exhausted, but at the same time ecstatic. Something had changed in me. l'd been lost in Japan. Mt Fuji had found me again. lt taught me a lesson. Taught me that you can escape death. That is, a rigid image you have of yourself. l was 20 years old. l had yet to find what l was searching for. And that's why l loved life. That day l learned that to love, l had to be free. That day l learned that birth means both pain and joy. That day l learned that l had to become all the people l was, all the people l hadn't yet met. l learned that day l was as large as life. lf you die, go. lf you suffer, move. Movement is the only rule. The only dishonor is not being free.
===
Amelie to worker cleaning the pool she was in: lt's not necessary.
Worker: No English!
Amelie: lt's not English, it's Japanese!

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a
akirakato
Dec 21, 2016

This is a 2014 Belgian romance-drama written and directed by Stefan Liberski, based on Amélie Nothomb's 2007 autographical novel of the same name.
It is about an unreal and unnatural romance between a 21-year-old Belgian woman, Amélie (Pauline Étienne), and Rinri (Taichi Inoue)---a young Japanese man in Tokyo.
The director doesn't seem to understand the Japanese way of life, and most of the actors appear amateurish.
To the eyes of the Japanese audience, the things depicted in the film seem like those of a different country.
For example, Amélie eats a piece of a raw octupus in the Island of Sado.
But the Japanese don't usually eat it like that.
After all, there is not much in a love story.
At the best, this film is like a B-movie.

p
pomorat
Jul 16, 2016

I was completely charmed by this film. At first it seems to be a quaint romance between two young people but on a deeper level it actually reveals much about the Japanese, about our perception of foreigners, and the power of love to transcend cultural differences - or not. Fine music (original and traditional), photography, witty writing, and compelling performances from the two principles. Wonderful.

j
jimg2000
Jun 04, 2016

Captivating cinematography of Tokyo's landscape and cultural divide through the eyes of a twenty year old Tokyo born Belgian woman. Perky, quirky, bubbly, funny and lovely to watch. Based on the book with the same name published in 2007 but the film cleverly integrated artsy nude scenes and news footage of the Fukushima earthquake/tsunami of 2011. Prequel to "Fear and trembling, 2005," which was a delightful satire on the "odd" Japanese business culture based on Nothomb's 2001 book of same name.

m
ms_mustard
Feb 20, 2016

a cute romantic dramedy. she wants to be Japanese and he wants to be French.

the book was set in the 1990's but the director moved the time frame to 2012 to include the impact of the earthquake and tsunami disaster.

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