The Crying Game

The Crying Game

DVD - 1992
Average Rating:
8
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An unlikely kind of friendship develops between Fergus, an Irish Republican Army volunteer, and Jody, a kidnapped British soldier lured into an IRA trap by another IRA member. When the hostage-taking ends up going horribly wrong, Fergus escapes and heads to London, where he seeks out Jody's lover, a hairdresser named Dil. Fergus changes his name and gets a job as a day laborer. His starts seeing Dil, who knows nothing about Fergus' real background. But there are some things about Dil that Fergus does not know either.
Publisher: [United States] : Lions Gate Home Entertainment, [1992]
Edition: Collector's ed
Branch Call Number: DVD DRAMA Cry
Characteristics: 1 videodisc (112 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in. + 1 booklet
Alternative Title: Soldier's wife

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p
patch666
May 19, 2017

Great movie !!! beautifully filmed, scored and acted ~ its a story about two people falling in love ~ That's all. Sweet and touching moments with a little political violence. Still great after all these years. if you focus on the so called "shock ending" you miss the point. I understood it perfectly when I watched this as a teenager with my mother < you love who you love > its not about homosexuality or gender or any of that. He loves her, she loves him so simple and beautiful.

f
Fuzzy_Wuzzy
Oct 19, 2016

Just like a stinging slap to the face - 1992's "The Crying Game" gleefully delivered its "surprise twist" with the heavy-handed blow of a true sadist..... I would easily say that this "club-one-over-the-head" surprise-twist business was undoubtedly the only real reason why anyone would ever remember "The Crying Game", which I found to be a disappointingly poor excuse for a movie if there ever was one.

These cheap, sensationalistic tactics that were meant to surprise the audience quickly brought a fairly intriguing story that initially concerned IRA hostage-taking, and whatnot, to an absolute dead-halt. And from that point onwards, "The Crying Game" literally wallowed in its "surprise twist" for the remainder of the story.

With there being no mercy in sight - "The Crying Game" was shamelessly "trans"-formed (hint-hint) into a less-than-satisfying soap opera, where those trite, crass words "I love you" were only to be spoken with any real sincerity at the point of a gun.... And so, with that - It was shame-shame on "The Crying Game".

(sniffle-sniffle)

m
Monolith
Dec 12, 2015

Green_Bird_203 nailed it. Forest Whitaker was the highlight of the film and the rest was meh.

r
rswcove
Nov 24, 2015

This movie is only really remembered for the 'twist'. Which is a shame, because the film is a deeply nuanced examination of conflicting loyalties and guilt as a motivator. The movie examines how our worst instincts and our best intentions can influence each other in very strange ways. There's a political spy thriller in their too, but the characters run the show.

l
lukasevansherman
Mar 06, 2014

Dude, looks like a lady!

l
LeneB
May 14, 2013

this movie really conveys the emotional feelings of being a transwoman(mtf). it's better than TransAmerica hands down!

Green_Bird_203 Apr 24, 2013

The presence of Forest Whitaker is so enormous and charming that it lasted throughout the film. The ending is not well done, rather boring.

nsea2 Jun 09, 2011

This film explores the age old questions: What is love? What is loyalty? What are you willing to die for? What makes life worth living? Anyone who thinks this is a "gay film" has completely missed the point.

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