Emma

Emma

Book - 1981
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Random House, Inc.
Emma, first published in 1816, was written when Jane Austen was at the height of her powers. In a novel remarkable for its sparkling wit and modernity, Austen presents readers with two of literature’s greatest comic creations—the eccentric Mr. Woodhouse and that quintessential bore, Miss Bates. Here, too, we have what may well be Jane Austen’s most profound characterization: the witty, imaginative, self-deluded Emma, a heroine the author declared “no one but myself will much like,” but who has been much loved by generations of readers. Delightfully funny, full of rich irony, Emma is regarded as one of Jane Austen’s finest achievements.

Baker & Taylor
Follows the adventures of the self-assured and accomplished Emma, a twenty-one-year-old girl of privilege who believes she is immune to romance and has several chaotic and often humorous experiences

Baker
& Taylor

Follows the adventures of the self-assured and accomplished Emma, a twenty-one-year-old girl of privilege who believes she is immune to romance and has several chaotic and often humorous expreiences. Reissue.

Publisher: New York : Bantam Books, 1981
ISBN: 9780553212730
0553212737
Branch Call Number: PAPERBACK Classics Aus
Characteristics: 446 p. ; 18 cm

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xiaojunbpl12
Jun 21, 2018

Comedy to escape to for readers with “idle” time, no idle mind induced, but reprieved from reading of serious social realism. Touch of farcical and satirical effect may be the outcome of subconscious effort, reveals Jane Austen’s linguistic talent especially considering her limited experience and restricted exposure.
I liked Emma character (though she often acted against the honest and straightforward way, she’s the opposite of hypocrite.), no less than the book. Jane Fairfax and Mr. Knightly, the only characters that were not mocked, whom I liked the least, less than Mrs. Elton and Frank Churchill.
Remarkably, these characters are timeless and can be who we are.

r
re_discover
Jun 14, 2018

I read Pride and Prejudice a few years ago, and was looking forward to reading another one of Jane Austen's classics. I was very disappointed with Emma. Emma, the main character, is a rich dull woman with first world problems.

SPPL_Joey Mar 18, 2018

“A man," said he, "must have a very good opinion of himself when he asks people to leave their own fireside, and encounter such a day as this, for the sake of coming to see him. He must think himself a most agreeable fellow; I could not do such a thing. It is the greatest absurdity—Actually snowing at this moment!— The folly of not allowing people to be comfortable at home—and the folly of people’s not staying comfortably at home when they can! If we were obliged to go out such an evening as this, by any call of duty or business, what a hardship we should deem it;—and here are we, probably with rather thinner clothing than usual, setting forward voluntarily, without excuse, in defiance of the voice of nature, which tells man, in every thing given to his view or his feelings, to stay at home himself, and keep all under shelter that he can;— here are we setting forward to spend five dull hours in another man’s house, with nothing to say or to hear that was not said and heard yesterday, and may not be said and heard again to-morrow. Going in dismal weather, to return probably in worse;—four horses and four servants taken out for nothing but to convey five idle, shivering creatures into colder rooms and worse company than they might have had at home.”

f
fledge
Mar 23, 2017

Emma Woodhouse must be one of the most intelligent, delightful, self-deluded blockheads and busybodies in all of literature. Jane Austen’s prose was masterful. She could write three pages describing the need to go to the post office, integrating it seamlessly into her narrative, making it essential. An outstanding work of fiction. Highest recommendation.

l
lozza1401
Apr 14, 2016

When reading this I was extremely reminded by the movie Clueless. Great book nonetheless.

dgfe7ytrhgfo9t90 Jul 02, 2014

E MMA ARE YOU THERE!? emma what are we here for?

s
sofa2001
Apr 09, 2014

This book is equalled only by Rose in Bloom. I love the part when they go on the outing to Donwell Abbey. But who would ever guess that Frank Churchill actually was engaged to Jane Fairfax?

p
poem
Mar 05, 2014

This was such an amazing book. I have to admit when I first started reading Jane Austen I thought it might be a bit dusty and boring. However, Emma was so captivating and fun to read. Even though the language wasn't exactly what we speak now, I feel like teenagers need to be exposed to this kind of language to broaden our vocabulary. I mean if we can't understand what Jane Austen is saying, what will it be like for future generations? The novel revolves around a young, beautiful, rich and single girl named Emma who refuses to be in love. 'I never have been in love; it is not my way, or my nature; and I do not think I ever shall.' However, this doesn't stop her from playing match maker. This time, Emma is trying to set up one of her friends Harriet Smith even though her friend Mr. Knightley warns her not too. Soon her precise plans unravel unexpectedly, producing very different results. What I really loved about this book were the characters, Emma was flawed- no doubt about that but she was witty, charming and independent. She is by far one of the best heroines that i have read. She sees that she doesn't need romance to make her life happy, and I respect that about her. The title of the book is Emma because that is exactly what Emma wanted her life to be about, her. Not her being the wife of someone, or her living in someone else's shadows, but her accomplishments as independent women. I also really adored Mr. Knightley, he is just as clever as Emma and their conversations are interesting to read but he is a bit more of a realist than Emma, which is why the two contrast so much. Overall, I recommend Emma to any teenage girl, so they can realize they don’t need a boyfriend to be considered a person, we as women have the ability to define ourselves, through our own accomplishments, not through our relations.

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sumaiyah98
Mar 05, 2014

This was such a cute book, I read it a while ago but my sister recentally read it and I remembered how much I loved this book <3

Indigo_Cobra_8 Nov 03, 2013

I really like the characterization of Emma because despite all the mistakes she makes, there are moments in the book that show the reader she has good intentions. Quirky, fun plot with lots of twists.

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Quotes

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g
geraldine9
Aug 26, 2016

'I never have been in love; it is not my way, or my nature; and I do not think I ever shall.'

m
MZajdlik1
Aug 04, 2015

Mr. Knightley, in fact, was one of the few people who could see faults in Emma Woodhouse and the only one who ever told her of them. . . .

j
J9833
May 20, 2015

He has imposed on me, but he has not injured me.

h
hcr_violet
Jul 17, 2013

Nonsensical girl!

-Mr. Knightley

1
123_its_me
Jul 29, 2012

" I lay it down as a general rule, Harriet, that if a woman doubts as to whether to accept a man or not, she certainly ought to refuse him." - Emma to Harriet

l
lisahiggs
Jul 11, 2012

I am quite enough in love. I should be sorry to be more.

crystal_dark Nov 03, 2011

“Perhaps it is our imperfections that make us so perfect for one another!”

é
étoile
Dec 19, 2010

"Ah! There is nothing like staying home for real comfort."

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123_its_me
Jul 25, 2012

123_its_me thinks this title is suitable for 13 years and over

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